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Hold on…Should you sign that Nursing Home Admissions Agreement??? Not so fast…


“Read the agreement carefully before signing. Nursing Home Agreements can be complicated and confusing”


Admitting a loved one to a nursing home can be very stressful. In addition to dealing with a sick family member and managing all the details involved with the move, you must decide whether to sign all the papers the nursing home is giving you. Nursing home admission agreements can be complicated and confusing, so what do you do?

It is important not to rush, but rather to read. If possible, have your attorney review the agreement before signing it. Read the agreement carefully because it could contain illegal or misleading provisions. Try not to sign the agreement until after the resident has moved into the facility. Once a resident has moved in, you will have much more leverage. But even if you have to sign the agreement before the resident moves in, you should still request that the nursing home delete any illegal or unfair terms.

Two items commonly found in these agreements that you need to pay close attention to are a requirement that you be liable for the resident’s expenses and a binding arbitration agreement.

Responsible party A nursing home may try to get you to sign the agreement as the “responsible party.” It is very important that you do not agree to this. Nursing homes are prohibited from requiring third parties to guarantee payment of nursing home bills, but many try to get family members to voluntarily agree to pay the bills.

If possible, the resident should sign the agreement him- or herself. If the resident is incapacitated, you may sign the agreement, but be clear you are signing as the resident’s agent. Signing the agreement as a responsible party may obligate you to pay the nursing home if the nursing resident is unable to. Look over the agreement for the term “responsible party,” “guarantor,” “financial agent,” or anything similar. Before signing, cross out any terms that indicate you will be responsible for payment and clearly indicate that you are only agreeing to use the resident’s income and resources to pay.

Arbitration provision Many nursing home admission agreements contain a provision stating that all disputes regarding the resident’s care will be decided through arbitration. An arbitration provision is not illegal, but by signing it, you are giving up your right to go to court to resolve a dispute with the facility. The nursing home cannot require you to sign an arbitration provision, and you should cross out the arbitration language before signing.

Other provisions The following are some other provisions to look out for in a nursing home admission agreement.

Private pay requirement. It is illegal for the nursing home to require a Medicare or Medicaid recipient to pay the private rate for a period of time. The nursing home also cannot require a resident to affirm that he or she is not eligible for Medicare or Medicaid. Eviction procedures. It is illegal for the nursing home to authorize eviction for any reason other than the following: the nursing home cannot meet the resident’s needs, the resident’s heath has improved, the resident’s presence is endangering other residents, the resident has not paid, or the nursing home is ceasing operations. Waiver of rights. Any provision that waives the nursing home’s liability for lost or stolen personal items is illegal. It is also illegal for the nursing home to waive liability for the resident’s health.

This article comes from my December Elder Law Answers Newsletter, you can get it free here: Free Elder Law Newsletter

For more information regarding this article feel free to contact me.

Regards, Brian Brian A. Raphan, P.C. 7 Penn Plaza   |   7th Ave/31st Street   |   New York, NY 10001 212-268-8200 http://www.raphanlaw.com

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BRIAN A. RAPHAN, ESQ.

BRIAN A RAPHAN, P.C.
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The information on this site is not, nor is it intended to be legal advice and does not automatically create an attorney/client relationship.  On negligence and medical malpractice cases we may participate or partner with other counsel with disclosure to potential client before we or such partnering counsel accept the case.                         © 2020 Brian A. Raphan, P.C.